Explanation of interrogative and relative pronouns

Explanation of interrogative and relative pronouns

Explanation of interrogative and relative pronouns

Interrogative and relative pronouns are both types of pronouns that are used to ask questions or to connect two different parts of a sentence.

Interrogative pronouns are used to ask questions. They include words such as "who", "what", "where", "when", "why", and "how". For example, "Who is coming to the party?" or "What time is the meeting?"

Relative pronouns, on the other hand, are used to connect a clause or phrase to a noun or pronoun that it describes. They include words such as "who", "whom", "whose", "which", and "that". For example, “The man who is wearing the red shirt is my brother" or "The book that I am reading is very interesting”.

One important difference between the two types of pronouns is that interrogative pronouns are used to ask questions, while relative pronouns are used to connect clauses or phrases to the noun or pronoun that they modify.

Another difference is that interrogative pronouns usually come at the beginning of a sentence, while relative pronouns are used in the middle of a sentence to connect different parts of the sentence.

Overall, both interrogative and relative pronouns play important roles in the English language by helping to clarify and connect different parts of a sentence, and by allowing us to ask questions and seek information.

Interrogative pronouns

Of course, it is very clear to us. They are pronouns that we use to form the question, whatever the question is about, when or where…etc.

Ok, let's get to know these pronouns

  1. Who?, Whom
  2. What
  3. Which
  4. Whose
  5. When

It's right ? You are not required to do anything other than memorize them, so we will use them to form the question later.

Relative Pronouns

Its types are ( who - whom - which - that )

They are pronouns that come to denote a noun or a sentence or to emphasize the presence of the subject or object, and they come after the noun that they denote directly.

What does this song meaning mean, Miss, don't you understand?

Just come here and see the examples, and you will understand

1. Who (in the sense of who and who) denotes the subject in the sentence and is used for the same only singular and plural, and it is a nominative pronoun

Example

That is the man who told me

Here, in the example, you see the word (who), which we removed and put in its place (who) in the English sentence

And if we want to return the sentence to its origin, it will be

The man told me

And the pronoun (who) was associated with its relative clause, which is the man, so it became the man who told me.

What do we get from here?

The (who) denotes the subject in the same relative clause, of course, whether singular or plural

2. Whom

In the sense of (who or which) and denotes (the object or dative noun) in the relative clause and is used for the same only singular and plural.

Example

This is the singer I met yesterday/translation/

This is the singer whom I met yesterday

In this example, the pronoun (whom) corresponds to it in the Arabic sentence with the demonstrative noun (who).

The original sentence, if we return it to its origin, will be I met the doctor yesterday

Of course, the object here in the relative clause is the doctor.

Example

That is the girl whom I talked to

In this example, the relative pronoun is (whom) and the dative noun denoting (whom) in the relative clause is the man

The original sentence is I talked to the man

3. Which

In the sense of (who or which) and is used for non-sane people only singular and plural, and it is (an accusative or plural pronoun).

Example

This is the motorcycle that I bought

Ok, look at the example here. Talking about who (the motorcycle) means unreasonable, so we used the relative pronoun (which).

4. That

It is often used in cases of accusative, prepositional, and no nominative - and it will be used for non-sane and sane people together, and it can be used instead of (who _ whom

Except for proper nouns, only (who, whom) is used with it.

Example

This is the man who that I can trust

Look here I used (who that)

As for proper nouns, we use (who, whom)

Example

I talked to john, who left yesterday

Ok, question: Is it useful in this example to remove (who) and replace it with (that)?

Ha, anyone knows the answer?

Of course not, because our sentence has a proper noun (john).

Let's come to some important rules in our lesson today

Base 1

The relative pronoun (which) can be used with plural nouns

Example

The team that wears green is our team
Translation / the team which wears green is our team
Fill in the plural (team) here, so we used (which) in the sentence.

Base 2

Only the relative pronoun that refers to the object can be omitted

Example

This is the motorcycle ( which - that ) I bought
The sentence after deleting the relative pronoun becomes
This is the phone I bought

After the deletion, it also became the same meaning

Base 3

When using relative pronouns, the object of the subject should not be placed after the relative pronoun clause

Example

This is a woman that I can trust
This is the woman that I can trust
Here, of course, this example is wrong for him?

Because I am still saying that it is not possible to put the subject pronoun after the relative pronoun of course, the correct sentence is.

This is the woman that I can trust
This is the woman that I trust

Example

This is the car you bought
This is the bicycle (which) I bought it

Of course wrong

So, what is the correct sentence? It is written like this.

This is the car (which) I bought
This is the car (which) I bought

Base 4

Currently, he no longer uses the pronoun whom, because he uses the pronoun who instead

Ok, let's come to a simple application to understand our lecture today

If you solve it, then you understood our lesson today




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